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School and Community-based Research Research

Training the Next Generation through SOAAR’s Summer Internship Program

Training the Next Generation through SOAAR’s Summer Internship Program

If you are interested in interning with SOAAR, email [email protected] for more details!

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Training the Next Generation through SOAAR’s Summer Internship Program

School and Community-based Research

Every summer, SOAAR invites 8-15 high school, undergraduate, graduate and medical students to join our research team to strengthen their skills in epidemiological, clinical, and community-based research. The students assist with various ongoing projects on the team and are able to conduct and shadow study enrollments, practice recruiting participants for studies, work with our statisticians to interpret the data analysis for the team, and contribute to scientific manuscript writing on our study outcomes. The students also attend weekly didactic sessions to learn from our team members on various research and medicine topics.

 

Community Research and Medicine Program (CRM)

Community Research and Medicine Program (CRM)

Based on the SMHRT curriculum, this program was started in 2017 to enrich local high school students’ understanding of public health.

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Community Research and Medicine Program (CRM)

School and Community-based Research

Based on the SMHRT curriculum, this program was started in 2017 to enrich local high school students’ understanding of public health. The program is broken down into three phases to help raise awareness and knowledge of pertinent health conditions in their community. The students learn about the basics of outcomes research, put their knowledge to work to understand a specific health condition that interests them, and work together to develop PSAs to share with their school and create community-based interventions to improve outcomes.

  

The Development and Evaluation of Educational Food Allergy Videos in Early Childhood

The Development and Evaluation of Educational Food Allergy Videos in Early Childhood

The goal of this study is to develop and evaluate three early childhood food allergy educational videos to educate young children, parents/caregivers, and EC educators/professionals on food allergy.

 

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The Development and Evaluation of Educational Food Allergy Videos in Early Childhood

School and Community-based Research

Food allergy education for the early childhood population (0-6 years old) is currently based on adaptations from elementary, middle, and high school populations. Therefore, SOAAR wishes to develop and evaluate three new educational videos/tools to help educate this population of young children, their parents/caregivers and early childhood educators and professionals about food allergy preparedness.

Improving Food Allergy Preparedness on College Campuses

Improving Food Allergy Preparedness on College Campuses

The goal of this study is to explore the systems, structures, and policies that currently support students with food allergies at college, assess unmet needs, and develop pilot interventions through the use of patient-centered design processes.

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Improving Food Allergy Preparedness on College Campuses

School and Community-based Research

In 2016, SOAAR began working with graduate students from Northwestern University’s Engineering Design Innovation address the specific issues that students with life-threatening food allergies face on college campuses. The students created prototypes for a campus program called “Spotlight on Campus Allergies” and it consisted of  five essential services: Compass, Cares, Captivates, Connect and Confidence. The ultimate goal of this project will be to roll out Spotlight on campuses nationwide to establish support and awareness for students with food allergy transitioning into college life.

Interventions included the following components:

1) Spotlight Cares: Preparing for College

2) Orientation

3) Campus Clubs: Joining a Club Sports Team

4) External Food Vendors: Increasing the Use of Best Practices on Campus

5) Emergency Response: Addressing Emergencies Involving Anaphylaxis. Each of these five areas consisted of different support strategies and resources to aid students in their daily life on campus.

To read the published manuscript on this study, follow the link below!

Dyer AA, O’Keefe A, Kanaley MK, Kao LM, Gupta RS. Leaving the nest: Improving food allergy management on college campuses.Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2018 Jul;121(1):82-89.e5. doi: 10.1016/j.anai.2018.04.009. Epub 2018 Apr 18. PubMed PMID: 29679763.

Food Allergy Peer-to-Peer Educational Videos

Food Allergy Peer-to-Peer Educational Videos

The goal of this study was to create peer-to-peer food allergy educational videos for elementary, middle, and high school students using format and content preference data collected through surveys and interviews with children adolescents, and parents.

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Food Allergy Peer-to-Peer Educational Videos

School and Community-based Research

SOAAR created peer-to-peer food allergy educational videos for elementary, middle, and high school students using format and content preference data collected through surveys and interviews with children adolescents, and parents.The videos were then filmed and produced in collaboration with a wide variety of food allergy stakeholders. Each video was then evaluated to determine its effectiveness in changing student food allergy knowledge, beliefs and attitudes. The videos are available for free in a USB format and have been distributed nationwide.

School Food Allergy Policy Study

School Food Allergy Policy Study

The goal of this study was to understand the current food allergy policies in place in schools and assess the barriers to their implementation.

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School Food Allergy Policy Study

School and Community-based Research

The aim for this project was to develop and administer two surveys targeting parents of school-attending children with food allergy and school nurses and/or administrators that care for and are responsible for developing health policies to: 1) Characterize current school-wide food allergy policies school wide in addition to policies that guide practices in the classroom, cafeteria, and during extracurricular activities; 2) Examine the acceptance, effectiveness, and feasibility of current food allergy policies; 3) Determine if parents and nurses/administrators agree with the policies currently in place and/or determine what their desired policies would be; 4) Develop policy recommendations specific to grade level, school size, and other school characteristics (e.g., nurse availability).

Read the published manuscripts on this study below:

Mustafa SS, Russell AF, Kagan O, et al. Parent perspectives on school food allergy policy. BMC Pediatr. 2018;18(1):164. Published 2018 May 12. doi:10.1186/s12887-018-1135-6

Kao LM, Wang J, Kagan O, et al. School nurse perspectives on school policies for food allergy and anaphylaxis. Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. 2018;120(3):304-309.

 

The Impact of Student-Directed Videos on Community Asthma Knowledge (START Program)

The Impact of Student-Directed Videos on Community Asthma Knowledge (START Program)

The START (Student Asthma Research Team) intervention was an after-school program where students were educated about asthma, participatory research methods, and media production to:

  1. Identify neighborhood factors affecting their own asthma through photography and writing and
  2. Address these factors by producing public service announcements to raise public awareness.
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The Impact of Student-Directed Videos on Community Asthma Knowledge (START Program)

School and Community-based Research

This study evaluated the effectiveness of the student-produced START videos. Community members:

  • Completed a pre-test which assessed their pre-intervention asthma knowledge and behavior,
  • Watched the videos,
  • Immediately completed a post-test to assess post-intervention asthma knowledge and behavior, and
  • Completed a post-test 4 months later.

Results:

The student-directed PSAs were found to significantly increase asthma knowledge among community members, irrespective of age, gender, or race. Increased knowledge persisted through the 4-month post PSA follow-up. Of the participants who were successfully contacted for the follow-up survey, nearly 40% reported meaningful behavior-change in response to the PSAs. This lead to the development of the SMART program and the most recent SMHRT curriculum that can be utilized by schools nationwide to help students better understand the health conditions in their community.

 

Resources:

Improving Community Asthma through a Student Media-Based Research Intervention (SMART Program)

Improving Community Asthma through a Student Media-Based Research Intervention (SMART Program)

SOAAR was funded by the American Lung Association to refine START by using mobile technology. The resulting intervention was called, “Student Media-based Asthma Research Team” (SMART) and was implemented at James Hedges Elementary in Back of the Yards and Beasley Elementary in Washington Park.

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Improving Community Asthma through a Student Media-Based Research Intervention (SMART Program)

School and Community-based Research

After identifying substantial disparities in childhood asthma within the city of Chicago, Dr. Gupta developed a strong interest in partnering with schools in communities with high asthma prevalence to investigate the community-level factors that may contribute to this elevated asthma burden.

She was funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation via their Physician Faculty Scholars Program to develop and implement a media-based participatory asthma program for students with asthma called the STudent Asthma Research Team (START).

Learn about the history of the START and SMART programs: Watch Dr. Gupta’s presentation, listed below.

2017 USAsthma Summit: “School-based asthma interventions, with lessons learned from START and SMART”.  

Dr. Ruchi Gupta does a wonderful job of providing summit participants with an overview of what the START and SMART programs have achieved, including an increase in students’ self-advocacy and empowerment and an increase in asthma awareness in the Chicago community.

To obtain a copy of the curriculum that Dr. Gupta refers to in the video, email [email protected].

Resources:

Student Media-Based Health Research Team (SMHRT)

Student Media-Based Health Research Team (SMHRT)

SMHRT is a comprehensive curriculum that can be shared with educators, public health practitioners, and community members to be utilized in schools to help empower students to research and understand the health conditions that affect their communities.

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Student Media-Based Health Research Team (SMHRT)

School and Community-based Research

SMHRT is a comprehensive curriculum that can be shared with educators, public health practitioners, and community members to be utilized in schools to help empower students to research and understand the health conditions that affect their communities. The curriculum gives teachers and students tools to create community-level change through building media-based interventions such as PSAs, educational videos, and visual campaigns. The SMHRT curriculums are free in USB format for any school who wishes to utilize it and have been consistently distributed nationwide.

  • Students of any age may participate,
  • Any chronic health condition may be studied
  • Interventions may include PSAs, posters, fact sheets, and musical performances

If you are interested in ordering the free SMHRT Curriculum for your school, please contact [email protected] for more details!